Concussion: What is it and what to do in case of one?

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Concussions are the least severe type of traumatic brain injury (TBI). They are caused by blows to the head due to falls, vehicle accidents, sports, work accidents, and other circumstances.

Three Types of Concussions:

# 1 Grade 1 concussion: These are considered mild, and symptoms generally last less than a quarter of an hour. There is no loss of consciousness involved.

# 2 Grade 2 concussion: They are considered moderate and do not present loss of consciousness. Symptoms of this type of concussion last more than 15 minutes.

# 3 Grade 3 Concussion: These are severe concussions and require immediate medical attention. If you suffer this type of injury, you will lose consciousness, sometimes for several seconds.

While the recovery time from a concussion can vary dramatically depending on the severity of the injury, 80% of concussion victims will generally recover within one to two weeks. A doctor will be able to guide you regarding treatments and a more successful recovery time.

Common Symptoms of a Concussion:

  • Confusion, trouble concentrating
  • Headache
  • Sensitivity to sound and light
  • Motor skills, speech, and balance problems
  • Memory loss
  • Noticeable mood swings
  • Drowsiness

What to do if a concussion was caused by an accident

If you have recently been the victim of an accident that resulted in a concussion, your priority should be to seek medical attention. Brain injuries can be dangerous and even fatal if left untreated, so immediate medical consultation or emergency services are essential.

After making sure that your physical health is not at risk, the next step should be to get legal help. Working with a brain injury attorney will ensure that your financial condition is taken care of and that you receive the compensation you deserve for how your life has been affected. 

No matter the type, concussions can be very costly as victims may need extensive medical care, therapy, or even major lifestyle changes to recover fully.